4 Out 1 In Motion Offense - FastModel Sports

Published 04/18/2018 by Hunter Lochmann Favorite Send to FastDraw Print Embed

About This Play/Drill

This 4 out, 1 in motion style offense is not a patterned or continuity style offense, but rather a set of rules designed to give players the ability to read and react to the defense.
 
This offense is easy to learn yet hard to perfect. It's also very hard to scout and prepare for once fully implemented, due to its read and react nature.
 
It is best used by teams that are guard heavy, but can be adjusted to fit any type of lineup.
 
Jr. Wizards Coaches Manual
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • Basketball Play - 4 Out 1 In Motion Offense
  • This 4 out, 1 in motion style offense is not a patterned or continuity style offense, rather a set of rules designed to give your players the ability to read and react to the defense.

     

    This offense is easy to learn yet hard to perfect. It's also very hard to scout and prepare for once fully implemented, due to its read and react nature.

     

    Once your players feel comfortable, this offense can be initiated by any of the 4 perimeter players in any of the 4 spots. For our purposes we will start the ball with the 1 in the right slot position.
     

  • Spacing is vital in any offense - but it is especially true here.

     

    The first thing players need to grasp is that all 4 spots on the perimeter - 2 wing spots (foul line extended) and 2 slot spots (lane line extended) are properly filled, with players 12-15 feet apart.

     

    The 5 should always begin at the block opposite from the ball.

     

    There are two basic rules that form this offense's foundation - slot to wing pass - cut through; slot to slot pass - screen away. Once these rules are mastered, the options become endless.

     

    The third rule is simple - every catch is a catch to score. We do not ever catch and hold the ball over our head looking for the next pass in this offense. We catch low and in a stance, forcing the defense to respect the three point shot.

     

    Rule #1: Slot to wing = cut through

    Rule #2: Slot to slot = screen away

    Rule #3: Every catch is a catch to score.
     

  • On a slot to wing pass, the slot (1) will make a hard basket cut.

     

    Always set the defender up by taking a step away, and try to swim over his/her face.

     

    Don't let players go through the motions on this cut. Each cut needs to be a scoring cut - if only to keep constant pressure on the defense.
     

  • If the cutting slot player (1) is not open on the basket cut, he/she continues through to the opposite wing.

     

    As the cutter goes through the lane, he/she can set a brush screen for the 5, who comes to the strong side ball - low and showing a target.

     

    Advanced: Before making this cut - the 5 should read the situation. If it looks as if the wing (2) might drive, he/she should stay at the opposite block, or cut low to the strong side short corner. The 5 can also choose to stay, keeping his/her defender off balance by being unpredictable.

     

    The remaining perimeter players rotate to fill the now vacated right slot.

     

    When filling a spot, we always cut through the elbow. Never allow your players to make a straight line cut. If the defense overplays, using the elbow allows the cutter the option to cut back door.
     

  • The next pass is a slot to slot pass.

     

    On a slot to slot pass, the passer always screens away.

     

    This pass provides us with the most options, based on how the defense decides to defend the screen.
     

  • The first option off the screen away is a simple replace. The wing (2) replaces the slot by cutting through the elbow.

     

    The screener (1) replaces the now vacated wing spot, opening up to the ball after setting the screen.

     

    The wing should always put pressure on the defense by coming off the screen hard. The decision to pop, curl, fade, etc. is made in the moment, depending on how the defense guards. Read & react.
     

  • As with every cut through the elbow, if the defense overplays the offense has the option to go back door.

     

    This also opens up a skip pass to the wing if both defenders chase the back door cut.
     

  • The next option is the hard curl.

     

    The screener opens up to the ball and fills the spot position, ready for the shot in case both defenders chase the curler.

  • If the defense collapses to the curling player, the screener will likely be open for a three off a skip pass.

  • If the screen is defended well, the left slot can dribble replace to fill the right slot.

     

    The screener (1) would replace out to the right wing. If 4 were to pass to 1 here, 4 would then cut through (slot to forward pass).

     

    The curling player (2) would continue through to the opposite wing, and the opposite wing (3) would replace to the left slot.
     

  • If the defense cheats, the wing (2) can always fade the screen. The screener would then roll to the rim after the hard fade.
     

  • If the defense anticipates the curl and overplays, the screener (1) should slip the screen.
     

  • Let's take a look at one full ball reversal - starting with a slot to wing pass on the right side.
     

  • The cuts should be timed so that the player replacing the left slot (3) hits the elbow as the player replacing the right slot (4) catches the ball.

     

    If the player arrives too early, it's an easy steal. Too late and the defense has time to recover.


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  • Because of the quickness of the ball reversal, both slot positions were vacant. In this situation the wing (2) would continue across the foul line to the left elbow and replace the left slot, as the other players fill in behind him. 4 would become the right slot, 3 would become the right wing.

     

    The ball has now been reversed from one wing to the other. The more times you reverse the ball, the higher the chances of a defensive breakdown.

     

    Let's look at a few more options that can be used.
     

  • Instead of passing the ball, the slot can always dribble to the wing. This is a signal for the wing to cut back door.

     

    A great time to do this is off of a ball reversal, when the defense is scrambling to recover.
     

  • When the slot player cuts through, he/she will often take the help defense with them. This can open up potential middle driving lanes for the wing.
     

  • The wing can call for a ball screen as the slot cuts through. This can either be a call from the bench, or a signal from the players on the floor (holding up a fist, etc).

     

    In this scenario, the 4 would cut to the weak side corner in anticipation of a kick out three.
     

  • The slot can also call for a ball screen - again either with a call from the bench or with a hand signal.

     

  • In this scenario, the weak side wing (3) should set a back or hammer screen for the weak side slot (4).
     

  • Any time a slot can beat his player off the dribble, the strong side wing needs to flatten out.
     

  • To review - There are three main rules.

     

    Rule #1: Slot to wing = cut through

    Rule #2: Slot to slot = screen away

    Rule #3: Every catch is a catch to score.

     

    When first learning this offense, keep it simple. Once the players get the basic movements down, and are comfortable with the three rules and keeping the 4 perimeter spots filled - that is when you can begin teaching the different reads.

     

    Every read - the hard curl, the ball screen, the back door cut, etc. - can also be a called "quick hitter" out of this offense. Have that in your back pocket in case you want to ensure that a certain player gets the ball in a certain situation - but don't over use it. The point of this offense is to allow your players to "just play" - to learn how to read a defense and react appropriately.

     

    An added bonus to this offense is that it can be practiced during your defensive shell drill - just eliminate the 5 man. It will allow your players to get more comfortable with the offense, while ensuring you can work on defensive positioning against an offense that is in constant motion.